Controllers are required to power up and control components like locomotives, sensors, signals and switches. They are also handling the communication between those components and the central automation software.

Introducing the “MattzoController”

We have developed our own “MattzoControllers” for the LEGO train system.

The controller is not for sale, and it doesn’t have a nice housing yet. I am publishing information about it here, so that anybody who is interested and feels capable can build it himself.

The MattzoController is based on a micro controller that unifies digital processing, input/output from/to the railway component, and WIFI connectivity.

MattzoControllers communicate via WIFI with a communication hub called “MQTT Broker” via the “MQTT” protocol.

The present firmware of the MattzoController is built for interaction with “Rocrail”. Rocrail is a free, open-source software to control model railways. MattzoControllers natively understand the Rocrail protocol. That means, that no other translation layer is needed to enable the communication between Rocrail and the controllers.

Rocrail can be supported with a small donation. In return you receive a license key that enables some additional features in the software. I would encourage every user to support Rocrail in order to ensure the long-time viability of the Rocrail project. Check the Rocrail website for more information!

Current status

At the moment, the following controller types have been published by Mattzobricks:

  • The “MattzoTrainController for Powered Up” to power up train motors and train lights.
  • The “MattzeSwitchController” for switches.
  • The “MattzoSignalController” for light signals.
  • The “MattzoSensorController” for reed sensors or other digital sensors.

The electrical wiring and the firmware of the different controller types are different, but all controllers also have strong similarities.

MattzoController in general

This section applies to all flavours of the MattzoController.

In this section, some common features of all flavours of the MattzoController are described. The different types of MattzoControllers are described in greater detail in the subsequent sections.

Building the controller

Instructions how to build the different controllers can be found in the subsequent controller-specific sections.

Firmware

You need the Arduino IDE to upload the firmware to the micro controller. Do NOT download the Arduino IDE via Microsoft Store. Download the installer directly from the download section of the Arduino website.

As we are using ESP8266 and ESP32 micro controllers, you need to add the following Board Manager URLs to the Arduino IDE (Menu File / Preferences, Additional Board Manager URL):

Required libraries depend on the MattzoController type. They can mainly be downloaded directly from the Arduino IDE. Details and exceptions are described in the source code for the specific MattzoController.

You need to copy the header file MattzoController_Network_Configuration.h to the library directory of the Ardunio IDE and enter your network settings. This way, the network settings are centrally configured, which makes maintenance of your network settings significantly easier.

Press the button to download the firmware. The file contains different sketches, one for each type of the MattzeController.

Download
MattzoController Firmware V0.2.1

The firmware has been published under the MIT license. By downloading the software, you agree to the conditions of the license.

Firmware Version History

  • V0.2.1 of November 19th, 2020
    • Changes in firmware for MattzoTrainController for Power Functions:
      • Bugfix
      • Power range optimized (introduction of MIN_ARDUINO_POWER parameter)
  • V0.2 of October 25th, 2020
    • First release of the MattzoTrainController for Power Functions.
    • Central network configuration file to configure SSID, WiFi passphrase and MQTT broker IP address.
    • Various code improvements.
  • V0.1 of June 6th, 2020
    • First publically released firmware for MattzoSensorController, MattzoSignalController and MattzoSwitchController.

Connectivity

On first boot, the controller generates a random number called “MattzoControllerID”. This id is an integer value between 1 and 65000 (16383 for MattzoTrainControllers). The MattzoControllerID is stored in the long-term memory of the micro controller and used on any subsequent operations.

The MattzoController then tries to connect to WIFI. The SSID and WIFI passphrase must be set in the source code before you upload the firmware in order to enable the controller to establish the connection.

After establishing a WIFI connection, it connects to the MQTT broker. The IP address of the MQTT broker must also be set in the source code.

After the controller has connected to the MQTT broker, the MattzoControllerID can be identified by monitoring the MQTT messages on the MQTT broker. To inspect the MQTT message, you must run the MQTT broker in a mode in which it logs out the MQTT messages. This is often called the “verbose” mode. If mosquitto is used as MQTT broker, the verbose mode can be started in MS Windows, open a command line window, navigate to the mosquitto installation directory and type “mosquitto -v”.

The controllers send last will messages to the MQTT broker upon disconnection. Those messages trigger the emergency break for all MattzoTrainControllers, i.e. all trains stop if a controller disconnects from the MQTT broker. This helps in certain situations to prevent larger crashes on the layout.

How to contribute

The code is managed as a git repository on Github.

If you would like to contribute with code improvements or enhancements, send us an e-mail to info@mattzobricks.com.

We might set the git repository to public on day… we will decide that later.

Controller Setup

First you need to build the controller and upload the firmware with the correct SSID, WIFI passphrase and IP address of the MQTT broker. To complete this task successfully, it is helpful if you have played around with Arduino or something similar before. It is even more helpful if you have basic understanding of programming and micro controllers.

Beside the WIFI and MQTT settings in the code, a MattzoController needs no specific setup.

Then download and install a MQTT broker and start it somewhere in your local network, e.g. on the computer on which Rocrail is running. The most common MQTT broker is the free “mosquitto” software, which can be downloaded from https://mosquitto.org.

Rocrail Setup

Download and install Rocview on your computer.

Required settings:

  • Tab “Service”
    • Rocrail Properties (menu File / Rocrail Properties)
      • MQTT Service
        • Hostname: IP address of the MQTT broker (e.g. localhost)
  • Tab “Controller”
    • Add the “virtual” controller.
    • Rename it to “vcs-1” or similar.

Problem Fighting

  • If Rocrail does not receive sensor events from the MattzoController, you should first check if the controller has booted correctly. If this is not the case, it may help to disconnect LEDs or sensors from the micro controller and try again.
  • Then you should check if the controller has successfully connected to WIFI. Make sure that you have sufficient WIFI coverage at the desired location of the controller.
  • Check if the controller has successfully connected to MQTT. If you use mosquitto, it may help to subscribe to the MQTT broker with the command line “mosquitto -h localhost -t # -v” and check if there are incoming messages from the controller at all.
  • Check if Rocrail is configured correctly.

Tips and Tricks

  • Make sure that all network nodes have permanent and sufficient WIFI reception!
  • Make sure that the controllers have sufficient power supply. This applies especially to the MattzoSwitchController, but in general also to the other controller types!
  • Reduce anything that could cause lags and delays on your computer, e.g.:
    • Switch off “Trace” in Rocrail.
    • Do not run mosquitto in verbose mode when actually operating real trains.
    • Switch off desktop background slide shows that load complex pictures.
    • Switch off complex screen savers.
    • Stop clients like Dropbox, OneDrive, iCloud or other cloud upload/download software. They demand significant processing and network ressources on your computer and may come to live arbitrarily.
  • If you not attending your layout, power down all MattzoSwitchControllers for security reasons. If a switch motor is trying to turn to a position that it can not achieve, it will block, overheat and eventually break. MattzoSwitchControllers are trying to turn the servo motor as they are told from Rocrail. It is important to note that a simple configuration error can cause the switch motor to overheat! PLEASE TAKE THIS WARNING SERIOUS. I have reports of a user who literally BURNED off an ESP-8266 micro controller. With “burn” I mean: it went on flames!

Planned Improvements

  • Improve start-up behaviour.
  • WIFI connectivity via WPS.
  • Automatically search for MQTT brokers.
  • Store SSID and MQTT address in EEPROM upon successful connection.
  • Evaluate controllers voltage supply and report to monitoring software components.
  • Code improvements.
  • Translation of this page in German.
  • Production of some tutorials videos.

MattzoSensorController

Purpose

The MattzoSensorController is designed to receive input signals from digital sensors like reed switches and pass the information on to the Rocrail via the MQTT broker.

Functional Description

The controller connects to MQTT as described in the “General” section.

When a connected sensor has contact with a vehicle, the controller instantly sends a sensor event to the MQTT broker.

When a sensor looses contact, the controller waits one second after it sends the “sensor disconnected” event to the MQTT broker. If the sensor has reestablished contact during this period, the “sensor disconnected” event is omitted or postponed.

Up to four reed sensors (or other digital sensors) can be connected to the controller. For more information about reed sensors refer to the sensor section.

To facilitate error search and debugging, the controller has four LEDs. The LEDs light up when the controller is connected to the MQTT broker and a sensor has contact. The LEDs also light up in a certain sequence when searching for WIFI and the MQTT broker and act as a status indicator in this operation mode.

Wiring

The following diagram shows the wiring of the controller.

MattzoSensorController: Wiring Diagram

Required components:

  • I/O board with micro controller. We have used a NodeMCU Amica Modul V2 ESP8266 ESP-12F. Similar modules should work as well.
  • 4 reed sensors (details: see sensor page).
  • 4 resistors (10 or 100 kΩ).
  • 4 LEDs. Make sure that the LEDs cope with the power supply. Depending on the type of LED, they each might need one additional resistor wired in series.
  • Basic stuff like bread board, wires etc.

The LEDs are optional. They help to monitor the correct operation of the controller.

The controller can be powered up with a simple USB charger over USB or some other power supply of similar voltage that is connected to the VIN and GND pins of the controller.

Setup

For general setup instructions please refer to the “General” section.

To setup the sensor in Rocrail, navigate to the interface tab of the sensor definition. The MattzoControllerID must be used as “Bus” parameter, and the port of the sensor as “Address”.

The first port has the number “1” (not “0”).

ALL OTHER INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE CAN BE NEGLECTED AND HAS NO MEANING!

Sensor configuration in Rocrail

MattzoSignalController

Purpose

The MattzoSignalController is designed to receive signal commands from Rocrail via the MQTT broker and set light signals to a specific signal state.

Functional Description

When Rocrail wants a signal to change state, it communicates this as a command via the MQTT broker. The MattzoController receives this command and evaluates, if the command is relevant for the specific controller (i.e. if the signal is connected to this controller).

The signal state is communicated from Rocrail by switching specific LEDs on and off. Example: a signal has a red and a green light. If the new signal state is “green”, Rocrail sends two commands: 1. red off, 2. green on.

Up to eight LEDs can be connected to the controller. If standard signals with only red and green LEDs are used, this means, that four signals can be attached to one controller.

Wiring

The following diagram shows the wiring of the controller. As an example, four simple signals with one red and green LED each are connected to the controller.

MattzoSignalController: Wiring Diagram

Required components:

  • I/O board with micro controller. We have used a NodeMCU Amica Modul V2 ESP8266 ESP-12F. Similar modules should work as well.
  • LEDs in different colors (red, green, possibly green and white) if you build the signals yourself.
  • Possible some resistors to protect the LEDs. Resistors with 220 Ω are frequently used for this job. In doubt ask the vendor of your signals or LEDs.
  • Basic stuff like bread board, wires etc.

The controller can be powered up with a simple USB charger over USB or some other power supply of similar voltage that is connected to the VIN and GND pins of the controller.

We do not have reliable information about the LEDs used in signals that can be bought of the shelf from suppliers like Trixbrix, 4DBrix and others. In doubt, I recommend to wire a 220 Ω in series to protect the LED and/or ask the vendor.

In the wiring diagram, the signals are connected to the 3.3V terminal of the controller. The signals light up brighter of the plus terminal of the signals is connected to VIN (between 4.5 and 5V if supplied via USB) rather than to the 3.3V pin of the controller. We have no information if the LEDs are damaged if you supply them with higher voltage. Again, I recommend to protect the signals with additional resistors if in doubt.

From time to time we have experienced boot problems of the controller. Interrupting the power supply (plus terminal) of the lights during power up helps. As soon we have found a better solution or work-around, we will publish it here.

Setup

For general setup instructions please refer to the “General” section.

To setup the signal in Rocrail, navigate to the interface tab of the signal definition. The MattzoControllerID must be entered as “Address” parameter, and the port of the LED as “Port”. This must be done for all signal states (usually only red and green).

The first port of the controller has the number “1” (not “0”).

ALL OTHER INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE CAN BE NEGLECTED AND HAS NO MEANING!

Signal configuration in Rocrail

MattzoSwitchController

Purpose

The MattzoSwitchController is designed to receive switch commands from Rocrail via the MQTT broker and set switches to the requested direction.

Functional Description

When Rocrail wants a switch to change direction, it communicates this as a command via the MQTT broker. The MattzoController receives this command and evaluates, if the command is relevant for the specific controller (i.e. if the switch is connected to this controller).

The switch command contains the controller id and port to which the switch is connected to, and the requested direction of the switch.

The number of switches that can be attached to one MattzoController depends of the “logical type” of the switch.

  • A standard switch has one switch motor, and needs one port. Up to eight standard switches can be connected to one MattzoController.
  • A triple switch has two switch motors, and needs two ports. Up to four triple switches can be connected to one MattzoController.
  • A double slip switch has four switch motors, and needs four ports. Up to two doube slip switches can be connected to one MattzoController.

You can also connect any combination of different logical switches types to a MattzoController, e.g.:

  • 2 Standard, 3 Triple
  • 4 Standard, 2 Triple
  • 6 Standard, 1 Triple
  • 4 Standard, 1 Double Slip
  • 2 Standard, 1 Triple, 1 Double Slip
  • 2 Triple, 1 Double Slip

Attention: if a double slip switch is connected, some special ports need to be configured in Rocrail (see below).

Wiring

The following sketch shows the wiring of the controller for 4 switch motors:

MattzoSwitchController: Wiring Diagram (for 4 switches)

Building a controller for eight switch motors is similar. The main difference is that you need a logic level converter the handles eight ports instead of four:

MattzoSwitchController with eight switch motor ports

Required components:

  • I/O board with micro controller. We have used a NodeMCU Amica Modul V2 ESP8266 ESP-12F. Similar modules should work as well.
  • Logic level converter with 4 or 8 channels.
    • An 8 channel logic level converter is recommended. We used a converter type “TXS0108E”.
    • ATTENTION: The TXS0108E has different operation modes, which can be configured by pulling the OE pin of the converter up or down. The OE pin of the TXS0108E needs to be pulled-up with a 10 kΩ resistor to bring it in the correct operation mode. You can see the wiring of the resistor in the picture above.
  • Basic stuff like bread board, wires etc.

The logic level converter is required to convert the internal 3.3V of the micro controller to a higher voltage.

The controller can be powered up with a simple USB charger over USB or some other power supply of similar voltage that is connected to the VIN and GND pins of the controller. Voltage should be in the range of 4.5V and 5V. Sufficient power supply is crucial because the servo motors require some power to flip the switches. If the power supply is to weak, the voltage in the micro controller goes down, which can cause a crash of the controller.

From time to time we have experienced boot problems of the controller. Interrupting the power supply of the servos during power up helps. As soon we have found a better solution or work-around, we will publish it here.

Setup

For general setup instructions please refer to the “General” section.

Standard Switch

To setup a standard switch in Rocrail, navigate to the interface tab of the switch definition. The MattzoControllerID must be entered as “Address” parameter, and the port to which the switch is connected as “Port”.

Enter the minimum value of the switch servo motor into the “Parameter” field, and the maximum value into the “Value” field.

ALL OTHER INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE CAN BE NEGLECTED AND HAS NO MEANING!

Switch configuration in Rocrail: Standard Switch

Triple Switch

To setup a triple switch in Rocrail, navigate to the interface tab of the switch definition. As we are configuring two switch motors now, we need to configure everything twice compared to the standard switch.

The MattzoControllerID must be entered as “Address” parameter, and the ports to which the switch is connected as “Port”.

Enter the minimum value of the switch servo motors into the “Parameter” fields, and the maximum value into the “Value” fields.

ALL OTHER INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE CAN BE NEGLECTED AND HAS NO MEANING!

Switch configuration in Rocrail: Triple Switch

Double Slip Switch

To setup a double slip switch in Rocrail, navigate to the interface tab of the switch definition. What we are now doing is to configure four physical switch motors with just two logical ports in Rocrail.

The MattzoControllerID must be entered in both “Address” fields.

The first port must be configured as port “1001”, the second port as port “1002”. This setting assumes that the first two switch motors are attached to port 1 and 2 of the controller, and the other two switch motors are attached to port 3 and 4 of the controller.

If you are configuring two double slip switches on a single controller, the second switch has ports 1003 and 1004, which requires ports 5 to 8 on the controller for the switch motors.

Enter the minimum value of switch servo motors into the “Parameter” fields, and the maximum value into the “Value” fields. The values are valid for pair 1/2 and 3/4 of the switch motors and can not be modified individually.

ALL OTHER INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE CAN BE NEGLECTED AND HAS NO MEANING!

Switch configuration in Rocrail: Triple Switch

MattzoTrainController for Power Functions

MattzoTrainController for Power Functions with 1 attached train motor and 2 LEDs

Purpose

The MattzoTrainController for Power Functions (MTC4PF) acts as a controller for LEGO Power Function Train Motors (or compatible) or other Power Function motors, e.g. the XL motor for the Emerald Express.

The MTC4PF also switches train lights on and off.

Functional Description

When Rocrail wants to make a train go into a certain direction, it communicates this as a “loco” command via the MQTT broker.

The MTC4PF receives this command and evaluates, if the command is relevant for the specific train controller (i.e. if it is built into the train that is being commanded). To evaluate if the command is addressed to the controller, it checks if its own MattzoControllerID corresponds with the “address” attribute that is configured for the train in Rocrail (see below).

If this is the case, it converts the desired speed and direction into the correct power for the LEGO train motor.

Up to two motors can be attached to the MTC4PF, one on each output of the motor shield. In the source code, you can configure the sense of rotation for both motors individually. A typical setup of two motors under a single train base would usually be forward/backward or backward/forward.

Please note that you must not connect more than one motor to a single output of the L9110 motor shield. Attaching two or more motor to a single output of the motor shield will overloaded it and eventually make it burn off.

You can also attach LED lights to the controller. They can be switches on and off with the F1 and F2 keys on the loco control panel in Rocrail. The controller has a lot more potential to switch extra lights, as all available PINs were not used completely. Rocrail supports up to 32 functions.

The controller continuously monitors its power supply. In future firmware versions (beyond V0.2) it is planned to adapt the motor power to the decreasing voltage of the battery.

Wiring

The following sketch shows the wiring of the controller with 2 attached train motors and 2 LEDs:

MattzoTrainController for Power Functions with two train motors and two LED lights.

Required components:

  • I/O board with micro controller. We have used a NodeMCU Amica Modul V2 ESP8266 ESP-12F. Similar modules should work as well.
  • Motor shield L9110
    • 2 channel motor shield.
    • Max. 12V.
    • ~800mA maximum continuous current.
    • 2A max. peak current (this is about the blocking current of a LEGO train motor).
  • LEGO power functions cable, cut in two halfs.
  • Power supply, around 9V. Some options are:
    • Non-rechargeable batteries
      • 6 AA or AAA batteries
    • Rechargeable batteries
      • 8 rechargeable AA or AAA batteries
    • If the loco provides enough space, we always try to use 8 rechargeable AA batteries.
  • Basic stuff like bread board, resistors, wires etc.

The voltage of the power supply is monitored using the analog input pin A0 of the controller. Please be aware that the reference voltage of the analog input pin A0 of the micro controller is usually 3.3V. If you attach more than 3.3V to this pin, you will destroy your micro controller. Use the voltage divider as depicted on the wiring diagram to reduce the voltage that reaches the A0 pin.

In version 2.0, voltage monitoring is already supported in the firmware, but no action is derived from it yet. That means, that you don’t necessarily need to build the resistors and cables attached to the A0 pin yet at this time.

Setup

For general setup instructions please refer to the “General” section.

To set-up a train controller in Rocrail, open Rocview and navigate to menu Tables / Locomotives. Choose the locomotive that you want to configure or create a new one.

Navigate to tab “Interface” and configure the address of the MattzoController. Then set the “Decoder Steps” value to 255:

Navigate to the “Speed” tab, and choose “Percent”. Enter useful motor power values for the different speed levels (trial and error):

Defining speed in Rocrail is a complex matter. More information about this topic can be found here.

There is a lot of additional configuration options for trains in Rocrail. Please refer to the Rocrail documentation for more information.

Additional Information

Please refer to the other pages on mattzobricks.com for more information and watch our videos on LEGO train automation on Youtube.

22 thoughts on “Controllers

  1. Hallo Mattze,
    Kompliment nochmal. Die Idee mit den Mattzo-Controllern über WLAN/MQTT ist der Hammer. Voller Enthusiasmus habe ich Deine Ideen nachgebaut und im Bereich Signale, Rückmeldung und Weichen alles bestens zum Laufen bekommen.
    Leider stürzt der Train Controller für PF im Bootvorgang permanent ab. Dies zu erörtern sprengt wahrscheinlich die Kommentarfunktion. Besteht die Möglichkeit über Mail mit Dir Kontakt aufzunehmen?

    1. Hi Thorsten,
      wegen Typen wie Dir machen wir das hier!! Ich freue mich über Kontaktaufnahme. E-Mail-Adresse steht im Impressum.

      Schauen wir mal, dass wir Deinen MattzoTrainController zum Laufen bekommen!

      Bis bald!

      Gruß,
      Mattze

      1. Hallo Mattze,

        spitzen Projekt, dass du da auf die Beine gestellt hast!
        Habe deine Servo- und Sensor Controller gleich mal in meine kleine 1:87 Car-Sytem Test-Anlage integriert. (Mit Hall-Sensoren statt Reed) Läuft wunderbar!
        Mit dem Train-Controller habe ich leider das gleiche Problem wie Thorsten oben beschrieben hat, der Controller hängt sich kurz nach dem Start auf.
        Gibt es dafür schon eine Lösung?

        Gruß, Leo

        1. Leo, probier bitte mal die aktuelle Firmware V0.2.1 aus. Ich glaube, Deinen Bug gefunden und beseitigt zu haben. Sonst bitte noch einmal melden! Danke!

          1. Hi Mattze, vielen Dank für das schnelle Update! Version V0.2.1 mit einem L9110 funktioniert bei mir!

    2. Hallo Thorsten,
      probier bitte mal die aktuelle Firmware V0.2.1 aus. Ich glaube, Deinen Bug gefunden und beseitigt zu haben. Sonst bitte noch einmal melden! Danke!

      1. Hallo Mattze,
        Top. Wie bei Leo funktioniert jetzt der Controller und dreht auch schon seine Runden auf der Testanlage.
        Danke Dir!

    1. Hi Paul,
      thanks. The MattzoTrainController for Powered Up is in the last stages of development and will be published soon. I have a small number of features and improvements that I want to include into the Firmware.

      Thanks for your patience.

      Cheers,
      Mattze

      1. Hello Mattze,
        Thanks for your responce, It explains why I could not find it.

        Hope to see it soon released, I ‘m building a garden layout and want to have some powered up trains running on it next summer.

        Keep up the good work,

        Paul

  2. Hallo Mattze
    So wie ich das sehe schlägt deine Idee sehr grosse Wellen !! Ich bin auf jeden fall hell begeistert von deinen Umsetzungen ! Ich hoffe die Power Up Firmware ist bald erhältlich. Habe die Automatisierung mal in einem Chat hir bei mir in der Schweiz angesprochen. Alle wollten es !¨Bis jetzt kann ich nur sagen Hut ab. Das kommt super. Hab leider noch keine eigene Automatisierte Bahn. Aber deine Idee soll umgesetzt werden. Freue mich auf weitere Updates. Lg Stoffel

  3. Ich bin doch sehr interessiert, diese tollen Ideen für mein Weihnachtslayout umzusetzen. Aktuell ist aber alles noch auf 9V und nicht automatisch. Ich frage mich nun ob es sinnvoller ist in die neue Powered Up Technik zu investieren oder noch versuchen die alten Power Functions Motoren zu bekommen. Hast du dazu eine Einschätzung?

    1. Hallo Ulrich,
      das ist eine gute Frage. Zunächst einmal würde ich nichts von Deinen 9V Sachen wegwerfen. Ich sehe da durchaus Chancen, dass es in diesem Bereich in den nächsten Jahren eine Renaissance geben könnte, auch im Bereich der Automatisierung. Bis dahin ist man aber auf Power on Board angewiesen (-> Batterien oder Akkus).

      Ich selbst bin bzgl. der Technologie offen. Bei Powered Up muss man am wenigsten oder gar nicht löten, dafür einen großen Geldbeutel haben. Unsere Power Functions Lösung ist zwar grundsätzlich super, allerdings muss man einiges zusammenlöten und die ganzen Dinge auch im Zug unterbringen. Und 4DBrix Empfänger hat kaum jemand.

      Ich würde empfehlen, mal mit der günstigen Power Functions Lösung anzufangen und da mal ein paar Controller zu bauen. Wenn Du damit klar kommst: alles gut. Sonst Powered Up machen. Wir werden das bald veröffentlichen, ich denke auch noch vor Weihnachten.

      Demnächst wird es im Bereich der Zugsteuerungen noch ein paar heiße Neuigkeiten geben. Details darf ich aber leider noch nicht verraten.

  4. Hello, great work here! I’m looking to train automation for the first time and I don’t have any component but I know I would like to eventually control my little train with MQTT. Would you recommend getting the Powered Up kit skipping over the older Power Functions? Thanks!

    1. Depends a bit on your available time, knowledge and the space available in your loco. Maybe using the Powered Up solution would be a good start. I am going to release the firmware for the MattzoController for Powered Up soon. It’s definitely the easiest solution for unexperienced users.

      1. Time is certainly an issue 😀 In terms of space my train suits the Power Functions components so it should be able to fit the Powered Up too. Do you know if it will be possible to communicate with your controller with tools like NodeRed with this new firmware?

        1. The MattzoController firmware communicates with Rocrail via MQTT. Unless you hack yourself into the MQTT messages, you’d have to modify the firmware. But it’s open source, so feel free to try it.

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